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Laremy Tunsil’s Draft Slide May Result in Criminal or Civil Liability

If you watched the first round of the NFL Draft, the big story was the sliding of Ole Miss offensive tackle Laremy Tunsil out of the top five to number 13. As the draft was unfolding, someone released a video of him smoking marijuana through a gas mask.  You can read the story here.  You … Continue Reading

No Crying Wolf: Retailer’s Website Held Not In Compliance With ADA

At the beginning of this year, we warned that there would be an uptick in American with Disabilities Act litigation related to website accessibility this year in a post entitled Does My Website Need to be ADA Compliant?  The answer then was “most likely yes.” Now, the adverse litigation results are start to come in.
According … Continue Reading

The Law Behind the Hulk Hogan $140 Million Verdict Against Gawker

A few days ago, a jury in Florida awarded Hulk Hogan (real name Terry Bollea)  $140 million because Gawker posted a leaked sex video of the former wrestler. Rather than focus on the lurid details (which you can Google), let’s look at the law that led to the two-week trial.
To recap, Gawker allegedly received the … Continue Reading

The Law Behind the Apple vs. FBI iPhone Unlocking Debate

By now, you have probably read about how the FBI is asking Apple to create software that would help the FBI unlock the iPhone of one of the deceased San Bernadino attackers. You have probably heard the talking heads scream about the privacy vs. security policy debate, but what law is at play?
The All Writs … Continue Reading

Texas High Court Rules Improper Photography Law Unconstitutional; Or, Why You Care a Creepy Dude Is Not Guilty

The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals ruled in a 8-1 decision yesterday that the “Improper Photography and Visual Recording Act” is facially unconstitutional.  The case involved a guy who allegedly took pictures of kids at a water park.  You can read more here.
Before you say, you are not a creepy person taking pictures of random … Continue Reading

Supreme Court determines Aereo violates copyright – back to the drawing board

This morning, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a 6-3 decision that Aereo violates copyright law by retransmitting over-the-air programming without authorization.  This will shut down the controversial start-up or force them back to the drawing board to come up with a new system.  The sound you heard was a huge sigh of relief of … Continue Reading

You’ve looked at my site and now you have waived your right to sue me. Is that legal?

I’ll admit, General Mills did not go that far.  What they did, according to The New York Times was notify customers that if they downloaded a coupon, joined a forum or entered a sweepstakes, the customer would waive their right to sue in court and would have to go through an online “informal negotiation” or arbitration.
Since … Continue Reading

When Online Behavior Crosses the Line – The Law on Threats, Libel and Just Being Rude

A frequent question we get is what can we do about the online posting about me?  Often times, the answer is not much.  Lawyers can only help when the online conduct crosses the line into a cognizable cause of action.  Figuring that out is the hard part.
The Threatening or Harassing Post
Is there an ex spewing … Continue Reading

Regulating revenge porn and explicit online communications with children – easier said than done

Everyone supports the prevention of sexual predators texting illicit material to people under 17.  Everyone knows that revenge porn is a scourge on public decency.  But, can the law do anything about it?  Should it?
Texas Throws Out Law Banning Explicit Online Communications With Minors.
Yesterday, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals (our highest court that hears … Continue Reading

Facebook “Like” is Protected First Amendment Speech

I don’t often make predictions on legal outcomes, so when I do and I get it right, it’s worth sharing.  In May, we talked about whether “liking” a candidate would constitute protected speech under the First Amendment.  A district judge in Virginia ruled it was not.  The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals recently reversed in … Continue Reading