Internet and the Government

In a developing story, The New York Times is reporting that the FBI is investigating the St. Louis Cardinals for hacking into the Houston Astros’ computer networks to steal the Astros’ internal baseball operation intelligence which is apparently working.

Quick aside:  click here to see highlights of last night’s win and the emergence of some

fcc_logoAs expected, the FCC passed the net neutrality rules today.  Other than spokesmen for the large telecoms (and perhaps some politicians who listen to that lobby), you don’t hear much reasoned opposition to net neutrality.

I have to admit that my views have been changing on the issue from a position of: (1) a solution

Everyone supports the prevention of sexual predators texting illicit material to people under 17.  Everyone knows that revenge porn is a scourge on public decency.  But, can the law do anything about it?  Should it?

Texas Throws Out Law Banning Explicit Online Communications With Minors.

Yesterday, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals (our highest court

While the second special session is winding down (thank goodness), we will take a look at a couple more new laws impacting online media and technology in Texas.  While most of the attention was on social media password protections, service via social media and online “compelled prostitution” legislation,  two additional bills made it through

Sometimes, when you read the basics of a story, it sounds so incredulous, you think “surely, there has to be more to it.”  Enter the story of 19-year-old Texan Justin Carter.   The quick headlines usually read – Texas Teen Faces Eight Years for Facebook Comment.

Unfortunately for Justin, the post was about shooting up

There are two bills (SB 568 and SB 501) working their way through the California Legislature that may require social media sites to erase the content of minors.

Oops . . . I shouldn’t have posted that.

California Senate Bill 568, which has already passed the Senate, would allow minors to request websites